While we celebrate Filipino representations in the international scene, we have to admit that in most cases it’s the ‘Tagalog’ representation that we get. Not that there’s nothing wrong with that. But in a multiculturally diverse country made of 7,641 islands, it can be totally exciting to see a different picture of Filipinos from other parts of the archipelago – say, the vibrant group of individuals hailing from the Visayas and Mindanao.

Craig of the Creek Features a Scene of Bisaya-speaking Grandmother!

Now renewed for its fifth season and ordered prequel film, Cartoon Network’s Craig of the Creek recently featured a Bisaya-speaking grandmother who also shares some familiar Filipino gestures and antics. In this particular episode, Craig was introduced to a Filipina grandmother by his friend who provided a quick orientation on how he should greet her, emphasizing on doing the “bless” or popularly termed as “mano po” – initiated by lightly touching the back of the hand of an elder to one’s forehead.

Upon doing so, the grandmother pulled that trigger question that most Bisaya kids got roasted to when introducing a friend coming from the opposite sex, “Imo ning boyprend?” (Is this your boyfriend?). Such accuracy brought so much laugher online, relating so much to the conversation.

Craig of the Creeks Fil-Am Directors Traces Roots in Danao, Cebu

Apparently, the episode that brought Bisaya representation to Cartoon Network and HBO Go wasn’t a spur-of-the-moment enlightenment. Such portrayal can be attributed to the highly diversified creative team that worked towards the promotion of a more inclusive world through stories – including its Filipino-American Director Tiffany Ford.

Tiffany Ford is the current supervising director of the GLAAD, Emmy, and NAACP Image Award-nominated series, Craig of the Creek. She also works as an illustrator, storyboard artist, writer, and even voiced some of the series’ characters. On top of that, she is also one of the creators of the series spin-off “Jessica’s Big Little World” and the award-winning series “Steven Universe” and Disney TV’s “Big City Greens”. Aside from that, she as well co-illustrated the New York Times best-selling children’s book “The Answer” by Rebecca Sugar.

Tiffany feels very grateful for her Filipina background – which she believed has helped her develop her artistic voice and storytelling. Her mother, who was an excellent storyteller and to whom she owes much of her humor and artistic voice, hails from Danao City, Cebu. Together with her mother, her grandparents, Benigna and Francisco Barriga also went to the US in the early ‘90s to help her mother raise her.

Growing up with her grandparents, Tiffany learned a lot from them – from being kind and patient, always having fun, being more resourceful, and putting much love towards

Like this article? Please share your thoughts below!